Waldorf with little ones

blowing_dandelions

 

 

 

 

 

I remember when my girls turned 4. It was the time when I started
researching homeschooling options and wondering if I really could
actually “do it.”

Soon after, Waldorf landed in my lap and I was hooked. It seemed to be
everything we were already doing and I was eager to learn more.

This is the point where many of you get “over whelmed” with the
amount of information available. Books, blogs, curriculum, guides,
oh my! What do I do?  Is it too late to start now?
Why aren’t they reading yet?
This is a high pressure time from family and relations who are well
meaning, but don’t quite get your chosen path.
It’s about having the confidence to know you are doing what is
best for your child and family. Standing up tall and smiling.
(all the while thinking “just wait and see!”)

Waldorf homeschooling doesn’t officially start until 1st grade.
So, what do we do with them before?

One thing I like to point out as many of you want to “imitate”
a Waldorf kindergarten- The Waldorf Kindergarten is set up to to imitate
the home!

So, don’t fall into that circle. Home is already a step ahead.

You have a kitchen for chopping and kneading and baking.

The warmth is there.
There are brooms for sweeping and towels to fold, beds to
straighten. Chores are a wonderful to include your preschool
and kindy aged child with the helping the so want to do.

The benefits of letting your child play are documented everywhere
these days. Their job is to play during these early years. There will
be so much time later for letters and counting.

Exploring nature, climbing, running and freely “being” is
what this age is about.

Yes, you can start creating a rhythm with circle time and
stories.  You can sing and dance and play with silks and
color.  Seasonal festivals can be added to monthly rhythm.
Crafts and finger knitting and very basic sewing are also
ways to fill your days.

Just be patient and let them be kids.

You can do it.

Shine on,

Donna

 

 

 

 

 

Kindergarten Days

 

 

I remember when my girls turned 4. It was the time when I started

researching homeschooling options and wondering if I really could

actually “do it.”

 

After attending a state hs convention, I found a book
where I took the survey in the back to help

me figure what type was right for me.. It didn’t include Waldorf (I don’t

think) but it did open my eyes. I disocvered I wanted something completely

different than traditional school setting.

 

Soon after, Waldorf landed in my lap and I was hooked. It seemed to be

everything we were already doing and I was eager to learn more.

 

This is the point where many of you get “over whelmed” with the

amount of information available. Books, blogs, curriculum, guides,
oh my! What do I do?  Is it too late to start now?
Why aren’t they reading yet?
This is a high pressure time from family and relations who are well

meaning, but don’t quite get your chosen path.
It’s about having the confidence to know you are doing what is
best for your child and family. Standing up tall and smiling.
(all the while thinking “just wait and see!”)

Waldorf homeschooling doesn’t officially start until 1st grade.
So, what do we do with them before?

One thing I like to point out as many of you want to “imitate”

a Waldorf kindergarten… that the WK is set up to to imitate

the home!

So, don’t fall into that circle. Home is already a step ahead.

 

You have a kitchen for chopping and kneading and baking.

The warmth is there.
There are brooms for sweeping and towels to fold, beds to

straighten. Chores are a wonderful to include your preschool

and kindy aged child with the helping the so want to do.

The benefits of letting your child play are documented everywhere
these days. Their job is to play during these early years. There will

be so much time later for letters and counting.

Exploring nature, climbing, running and freely “being” is
what this age is about.

Yes, you can start creating a rhythm with circle time and
stories.  You can sing and dance and play with silks and
color.  Seasonal festivals can be added to monthly rhythm.
Crafts and finger knitting and very basic sewing are also
ways to fill your days.

Just be patient and let them be kids.